Magazine

Archive: Bruce Spence

Date posted: 30 May 2017 Author: STC Production:  Dinner 

Bruce Spence has been a widely acclaimed performer on STC’s stages since 1980 when he made his debut with us in The Merry Wives of Windsor. Of course, Bruce has also enjoyed great success in film and television, having featured in blockbusters Mad Max 2 and 3The Lord of the Rings and The Matrix along with his AFI Award-winning performance in Stork in 1971. 

In 2020, Bruce returns to the STC stage for a family Christmas like you've never seen before: the darkly comic and eerily insightful Rules for Living

 

THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR (1980)

Bruce's debut came as Abraham Slender in William Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor.

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Bruce Spence and Redmond Phillips in STC’s The Merry Wives of Windsor, 1980 (Photo: Brian Geach)

 

 


MACBETH (1982)

Two years later, Bruce tackled another Shakespearean text alongside Hugo WeavingRobyn Nevin and Colin Friels in “The Scottish Play” as The Porter.


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Bruce Spence in STC’s Macbeth, 1982 (Photo: Brett Hilder)

 

 


SEDUCED (1986)

In 1986, Bruce starred as the lonely and paranoid Henry Hackamore in Sam Shepard’s Seduced.


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Robert Grubb and Bruce Spence in STC’s Seduced, 1986 (Photo: Hugh Hamilton)

 

 


TOM THUMB THE GREAT (1986)

Bruce displayed his versatility in a variety of roles in the comic opera Tom Thumb the Great.


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Gillian Jones, Bruce Spence and Julie Nihill in STC’s Tom Thumb the Great, 1986 (Photo: Hugh Hamilton)




FAMILY FAVOURITES (1986)

The same year, Bruce appeared in Family Favourites, directed by Robyn Nevin.


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Julie Nihill and Bruce Spence in STC’s Family Favourites, 1986 (Photo: Hugh Hamilton) 

 

 


SUDDENLY LAST SUMMER (1986)

Bruce appeared in Tennessee Williams’ classic Suddenly Last Summer, directed by Michael Jenkins.


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Gillian Jones and Bruce Spence in STC’s Suddenly Last Summer, 1986 (Photo: Hugh Hamilton) 

 



THE DON'S LAST INNINGS (1986)

And in his fourth 1986 performance for STC, Bruce performed in this two-person production.


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Bruce Spence in STC’s The Don’s Last Innings, 1986 (Photo: Hugh Hamilton)

 

 


AS YOU LIKE IT (1996)

After a ten-year break, Bruce returned to the STC stage in Shakespeare's comedy, directed by Simon Phillips.


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Penny Biggins and Bruce Spence in STC’s As You Like It, 1996 (Photo: Philip le Masurier)

 



THE WHITE DEVIL (2000)

Directed by Gale Edwards, Bruce played the role of Camillo in this Jacobean thriller. The following year, he travelled with this production on its tour to New York.


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Bruce Spence, John Gaden and Matthew Newton in The White Devil  (Photo: Robert McFarlane)

 



UNDER MILK WOOD (2012)

In this stage adaptation of Dylan Thomas’ poem, Bruce featured as Captain Cat alongside Sandy Gore, Helen Thomson and Paula Arundell.


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Helen Thomson and Bruce Spence in STC’s Under Milk Wood, 2012 (Photo: Heidrun Löhr)

 

 


THE SECRET RIVER (2013, 2016, 2017)

Bruce was part of the original cast of The Secret River in 2013, playing the role of Loveday. He toured nationally with the production and returned for its encore season in 2016 and its subsequent outdoor remount in an Adelaide quarry as part of the 2017 Adelaide Festival.


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Nathaniel Dean and Bruce Spence in STC’s The Secret River, 2013 (Photo: Heidrun Lohr)

 

 


CYRANO DE BERGERAC (2014)

One of STC’s most beloved works, this was the third new production of Edmond Rostand's classic. Bruce played both the rebellious Lignière and a nun.


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Bruce Spence in STC’s Cyrano de Bergerac, 2014 (Photo: Brett Boardman)

 

 


ENDGAME (2015)

In Beckett’s notoriously dark comedy, Endgame, Bruce played the role of Nagg.

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Bruce Spence in STC’s Endgame, 2015 (Photo: Lisa Tomasetti)

 

 


A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM (2016)

In 2016 Bruce took on another Shakespearean classic in the roles of Egeus, Tom Snout and the fairy Mustard Seed in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, directed by Kip Williams.


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Rahel Romahn, Josh McConville, Jay James-Moody, Bruce Spence and Emma Harvie in STC’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, 2016 (Photo: Brett Boardman)

 

 

DINNER (2017)

Towering and silent, Bruce played the Lurch-esque waiter in Dinner, directed by Imara Savage.

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Bruce Spence and Aleks Mikić in Dinner (Photo: Brett Boardman)

 

THE HARP IN THE SOUTH, PART ONE & PART TWO

From Irish immigrant family patriarch to local eye doctor, Bruce played a variety of roles in the epic 2018 adaptation of Ruth Park's classic Australian novels, The Harp in the South trilogy.

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Bruce Spence as John Kilker in The Harp in the South, 2018 (Photo: Daniel Boud)

 

 

A CHEERY SOUL (2018)

Bruce dons becoming silver curls as an elderly lady in the chorus of A Cheery Soul, directed by Kip Williams. In the same play he also plays a furtniture removalist, and a grumpy little girl.

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Jay James-Moody, Anita Hegh, Bruce Spence, Emma Harvie, Anthony Taufa and Monica Sayers in A Cheery Soul (photo: Daniel Boud)

 


Rules for Living, 26 Oct – 12 Dec, Drama Theatre, Sydney Opera House

Seeing the show? Let us know your thoughts. Tag @sydneytheatreco or #sydneytheatreco